Current Exhibitions

After America Day by Day: A Counter-cartography | Mariel Miranda

Lionel Rombach Gallery

Gold, Gold, in the American River!

Gold, Gold, in the American River!

Los Angeles, CA. Hollywood Blvd

Los Angeles, CA. Hollywood Blvd

Reno, NV. Archive Image, cowboy books

Reno, NV. Archive Image, cowboy books

Lone Pine, CA

Lone Pine, CA

San Francisco, CA. Chinatown

San Francisco, CA. Chinatown

San Francisco, CA. Mark Hopkins Hotel

San Francisco, CA. Mark Hopkins Hotel

Los Angeles, CA. East

Los Angeles, CA. East

San Francisco, CA. Castro Theatre

San Francisco, CA. Castro Theatre

Los Angeles, CA. East 2

Los Angeles, CA. East 2

Los Angeles, CA. Hollywood Blvd 2

Los Angeles, CA. Hollywood Blvd 2

San Francisco, CA. Castro District

San Francisco, CA. Castro District

Death Valley, CA/NV. “Here lies nostalgia”

Death Valley, CA/NV. “Here lies nostalgia”

Los Angeles, CA. MacArthur Park

Los Angeles, CA. MacArthur Park

For this exhibition I have compiled the evidence of my counter-cartographic response to the 1947 road trip that Simone De Beauvoir took through the American Southwest. Using her book “America Day by Day” as a map, I traveled 4200 km by car through the spaces that she visited, familiarizing myself with parts of California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. I worked with photography, writing, video, public intervention, and performance as methods of processing my journey.

This journey allowed for a political dialogue to grow between me–a mexican fronteriza artist–-and De Beauvoir, 73 years after her original road trip. Contemporary notions of territory, citizenship and landscape are explored in our dialogical fiction as I experienced the journey in situ, against the grain, and from a decolonial perspective.

Bio: Mariel Miranda is co-founder and director of the International Festival of Photography Tijuana (FiFT) a self-organized and feminist platform created for the undisciplined reflection on the image and its current modes of production. FiFT activities have been carried out in multiple spaces in México and the United States.

Miranda’s practice as a visual artist is built at the intersection of research, theoretical writing, production and the dismantling of images. Her work is primarily concerned with the visual and textual appropriation of archival materials to discuss issues related to the history of images: their epistemic inscription, their rhetorical narratives and their role in the complex social relations of power mediated by class, ethnicity and gender.

Recent honors include: The University of Arizona Fellows Award (offered to the University’s highest-ranked incoming graduate students) and scholarships for Mexican students studying abroad from the Jumex Contemporary Art Foundation and the National Institute of Fine Arts.

Alumni Exhibition: Kaitlyn Jo Smith and Marisa Lewon

Joseph Gross Gallery

Lights Out

Lights Out

Temporary Structures

Temporary Structures

Fixtures

Fixtures

Kaitlyn Jo Smith

American Standard, 2020

Manufacturing jobs began rapidly declining in the 1970’s with the collapse of the steel industry across Rust Belt states. Since then, factory workers have seen a steady decline in employment opportunities. More recently, 5 million U.S. manufacturing jobs have vanished since 2000; 4 million of these have disappeared as a direct result of automation. One of these jobs belonged to my father; this work is dedicated to him. American Standard is both an archeological and anthropological examination of the present that asks us to consider the implications of automation on society, more specifically, America’s working class.

I was raised by skilled laborers in a Rust Belt town in rural Ohio. When I was 13 years old, the facade of the American Dream crumbled before my eyes when the housing market crashed and nearly every adult I knew was instantly out of work. The Great Recession (2007-09) shuttered factories, turning a once bustling industrial region into a post-industrial wasteland. These modern-day American ruins have inspired me to share my family’s story. Over the past two years, my father and I have revisited the American Standard plant where he, and many of his brothers, once worked. In this landscape, we become the archaeologists of our collective histories through the excavation and preservation of once functional pottery (toilets).

American Standard replaces workers with machines to question the ethics surrounding the current state of labor practices in this country. By utilizing processes that have rendered the shift-worker nearly obsolete, including 3D scanning, 3D printing and machine learning, attention is drawn to the individuals that these processes replace. American Standard is a contemporary counter-monument honoring the working class through its use of deep fakes and non-functional utilitarian objects. It is through the installation’s ceaseless repetition that American Standard memorializes the digital age of mechanical reproduction.

 
Marisa Lewon

Temporary Structures, 2020

Temporary Structures is an amalgamation of sand, skin, self-understanding and time. Combining previous intuitive performance with interactive sculpture, I analyze my fragile relationship with unfamiliar landscapes. Having spent the first 25 years of my life oceanside, moving to the desert became both my inspiration and restraint. I use personal history to understand how the experience of where and how we are raised can alter reactions and perceptions of new landscapes as adults. Displacement and spaces that simultaneously provide comfort and discomfort are themes that serve as interruptions within this piece. While my immediate reactions are profoundly impacted by the varying landscapes I inhabit, the experiential residue of where I have been will never be washed away.

In this work, my perception of, and aversion to, ideas of home are echoed through exploration of personal memory. Utilizing the visual structure of a barnacle, I source the growth process of this creature to create a metaphor for human life. As “children” barnacles can freely swim about, much like a small fish or a tadpole. As they become mature, they create a calcified shell around themselves, remaining in one place until they eventually die, leaving behind just the shell as proof of their existence. There are many parallels that can be drawn between the life cycle of this small shellfish and humans. This fabricated mental reality that my work depicts represents a distinct binary between the desire to never settle and the need to find a place that feels secure.